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Fight Club

Starring: Edward Norton, Brad Pitt
Director: David Fincher
Genre: Drama
Year: 1999
Rating: 5 / 5

Reviewed by Guest Scribe Godking

When does a movie become alive in the collective subconscious, a viral contaminant that reaches out and leaves an indelible mark on the soul of every viewer? This meta-question is really important as one evaluates Fight Club. You see, Fight Club possess a strange life, one that starts as you watch the first flickering image of Brad Pitt through Ed Norton's desolate eyes. It looks like an after-image, the item burned on your retina from staring at the sun or watching something so horrific your mind burns it into you.

What has been created is a train of thoughts, a freight train rumbling through your head as you watch the self-destructive nihilism of Norton as he spirals into madness. It is a madness so shocking that he does not even accept the possibility of its occurrence, a madness so gripping that the audience does not see - but begins to fear - the inevitable collision of reality and insanity, as one fears the image of the next brutal blow to the face. Fight Club grabs the viewer and plunges them deep into the philosophic nature of the film, and the imagery used to accomplish this astounds and amazes.

One can only wonder, "Is this film for me?" Is this more mindless garbage, cinematic eye candy, wholly unredeemable as mainstream film, or is this what mainstream film should feel like - brutal, dark, and dirty? A collection of concepts so revolting that we become better people not though idol worship and an attempt to become something better, but through revulsion at the darkness each of us can adopt, and even embrace. Does Fight Club have meaning deeper than what is projected? I'll ignore that point, and just state the obvious. The First Rule of Fight Club is No One Talks About Fight Club.

Cast:
Edward Norton..........Jack
Brad Pitt..........Tyler Durden
Helena Bonham Carter..........Marla Singer
Meat Loaf..........Robert Paulson

Certification: Rated R for violence, language, and sexual situations.
Running Time: 139 minutes.

Additional Info: Internet Movie Database
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